NATURAL CEDAR & PRESSURE TREATED WOOD DECKS

Rediscover your backyard with a beautiful custom cedar deck handcrafted by the best deck builder in Little Rock.

We specialize in designing and building custom decks, patios, and outdoor living spaces. Their experienced team will collaborate with you to turn your vision into reality. From start to finish, they provide personalized service, ensuring every detail is perfect. Whether you prefer a classic wood deck or a sleek composite design, they have the expertise to create a space that reflects your style and fulfills your needs. As the best Little Rock deck builders, Trex Outdoor Living prioritizes exceptional quality and service, making them the trusted choice for outdoor living projects.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Wood Decks

What are the different types of wood used to build decks?

There are two main categories of wood used for decks:

  • Softwood: This is the most common and affordable option. However, it typically requires more maintenance than hardwoods. Here are some popular softwood choices:

      • Pressure-treated lumber: This is the most economical choice and widely available. It’s been treated with chemicals to resist rot and insects.
      • Cedar: Cedar offers a naturally beautiful reddish hue and repels insects. But, it requires regular sealing to maintain its appearance.
      • Redwood: Similar to cedar, redwood is naturally resistant to rot and insects. It weathers to a silvery-gray color over time.
  • Hardwood: Hardwoods are known for their exceptional durability and attractive looks, but they come with a higher price tag. Here are a few examples:

      • Ipe: This is an incredibly strong and rot-resistant wood that requires minimal maintenance. It has a dark brown color.
      • Mahogany: Mahogany offers a rich color and good weather resistance, but may require periodic sealing. Be aware that sourcing sustainable mahogany can be difficult.
      • Teak: Teak is prized for its beauty, durability, and natural oils that resist moisture and insects. It has a golden-brown color that ages to a silvery gray.

What type of maintenance is needed for a wood deck?

The maintenance required for a wood deck will depend on the type of wood used but here are some general tips:

    • Cleaning: Regularly sweep or hose off your deck to remove debris and dirt. You can also deep clean your deck once a year using a deck cleaner. Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions for application and rinsing.
    • Inspecting: Regularly inspect your deck for signs of rot, damage, or loose fasteners. Address any issues promptly to prevent further problems.
    • Sealing or Staining: Wood decks need to be sealed or stained periodically to protect them from the elements. How often you’ll need to do this depends on the type of wood, the climate you live in, and the amount of sun exposure your deck gets. In general, plan on sealing or staining your deck every 1-2 years for softwoods and every 2-4 years for hardwoods.
    • Winterizing: During the cold winters, it’s important to winterize your deck by removing all furniture, planters, and debris. This will help prevent moisture from getting trapped and causing damage to the wood. You may also want to cover your deck with a tarp to protect it from snow and ice.

How often should you stain or seal your deck and what type of stain is best to use?

The frequency of staining or sealing your deck depends on a few factors:

  • Wood type: Softwoods generally require more frequent maintenance than hardwoods. For example, pressure-treated lumber might need restaining annually, while cedar or redwood might last 2-3 years. Hardwoods like Ipe can go 4-6 years between applications.
  • Climate: Harsh sunlight, heavy rain, and high foot traffic will wear down stain faster. If you live in a sunny, rainy climate with heavy deck use, you’ll need to restain more often.
  • Stain type: There are three main types of stains, and each offers different lifespans:
    • Transparent stain: These offer the least protection and show the most wood grain, but they also need to be reapplied most frequently (often annually).
    • Semi-transparent stain: Offers a balance between color and protection, typically lasting 2-4 years.
    • Solid stain: These provide the most color and protection, and can last 4-6 years or more, depending on the quality.

Here’s a quick guide to choosing the best stain type:

  • For maximum natural look: Choose a transparent stain, but be prepared for frequent reapplication.
  • For a balance of color and protection: Opt for a semi-transparent stain.
  • For the most color and longest protection: Choose a solid stain, but be aware it will obscure the wood grain more.

Pro Tip: Always follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for application and recommended reapplication intervals for the specific stain you choose.

How often should you stain or seal your deck and what type of stain is best to use?

The frequency of staining or sealing your deck depends on a few factors:

  • Wood type: Softwoods generally require more frequent maintenance than hardwoods. For example, pressure-treated lumber might need restaining annually, while cedar or redwood might last 2-3 years. Hardwoods like Ipe can go 4-6 years between applications.
  • Climate: Harsh sunlight, heavy rain, and high foot traffic will wear down stain faster. If you live in a sunny, rainy climate with heavy deck use, you’ll need to restain more often.
  • Stain type: There are three main types of stains, and each offers different lifespans:
    • Transparent stain: These offer the least protection and show the most wood grain, but they also need to be reapplied most frequently (often annually).
    • Semi-transparent stain: Offers a balance between color and protection, typically lasting 2-4 years.
    • Solid stain: These provide the most color and protection, and can last 4-6 years or more, depending on the quality.

Here’s a quick guide to choosing the best stain type:

  • For maximum natural look: Choose a transparent stain, but be prepared for frequent reapplication.
  • For a balance of color and protection: Opt for a semi-transparent stain.
  • For the most color and longest protection: Choose a solid stain, but be aware it will obscure the wood grain more.

Pro Tip: Always follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for application and recommended reapplication intervals for the specific stain you choose.

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